Make Cause and Effect Work for You

cause Throughout your life you’ve been conditioned and conditioned yourself to believe in certain cause and effect relationships. Some of your cause-effect relationships may be faulty, however, because you formed in your mind some of those cause-effect relationships at times when you were too young, too ignorant, too traumatized, and/or too inexperienced to adequately evaluate the evidence at hand.

With practice, you’ve perfected your cause and effect relationships to such an extent that they have become automatic – so much so that you simply accept them as truth without question. Further, you tend to apply the “rules” of those relationships to later similar events. For example, the rule that “men cannot be trusted” because (cause-effect) one molested me as a child – taints all future encounters – setting up romantic interludes for failure before they even start. And there’s the first rub – your faulty cause-effect relationships have become so automatic you no longer question them – in fact, you may indeed be completely unaware of many of them.

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Amplified Rewards Lead to Success

If your end result imagery is vivid and compelling enough, you'll achieve it.

If your end result imagery is vivid and compelling enough, you’ll achieve it.

Want to succeed at something? Will it take some time? Then you need vivid, compelling outcome rewards!

Research out of the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf demonstrated that the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a part of the brain implicated in reward-based decision making, together with the hippocampus took part in predicting the degree to which forward thinking impacted current decision making. Further, the researchers discovered that the more vivid and compelling the end result imagery, the stronger the degree of impact on short-term distractions. In other words, the more vivid and compelling the end result imagery, the more likely the subjects of the research were to modify their behavior toward achieving the end result and declining short-term distracting rewards.

Let’s work with an example. Suppose you want to lose a few pounds but are faced with the temptation to eat something you know you shouldn’t. The short-term reward is obvious while the long-term reward fades away into what feels like the very distant future – “out of sight – out of mind”.

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Success and Failure

What if you could be guaranteed of success at ANYTHING you did? What would you do differently?

First, let’s take a moment to consider the relationship between success and failure.

You are always successful at everything you actually DO. AND – you are always successful in NOT doing what you don’t do.

You are ALWAYS succeeding at something.

What you do may not match your desire. And, your environment may give you the impression that you have failed at something. Yet, because you have actually DONE SOMETHING, you have succeeded in doing that something, whatever it is. Likewise, for those things you do not do, you have succeeded in not doing them.

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Rapid Eye Technology and Childhood Trauma

You can do something positive right now for future generations with Rapid Eye Technology.

No matter what your financial situation, you can do something positive right now for future generations with Rapid Eye Technology.

Many studies have shown that early childhood trauma is directly responsible for adult-onset mental distress like depression and PTSD. More recent studies have borne out that the brain itself is affected by early childhood stress – even stressors like poverty and neglect, which aren’t usually associated with trauma. Let me say it straight up – poverty is traumatic for a child. It’s not all that pleasant for adults, either!

We can maybe take some of the sting out of poverty and neglect through social and societal changes – which can take decades or longer to effect.

I propose a simpler, more direct, and immediate solution – Rapid Eye Technology (RET). Specifically, the Rapid Eye Technology birth and early childhood sessions – for adults!

Why adults when we’re talking about children? Continue reading

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It Wasn’t Me!

T. gondii bacteria directed the behavior of mice to help the bacteria complete their life cycle. T. gondii is found in as many as 20% of humans.

T. gondii bacteria directed the behavior of mice to help the bacteria complete their life cycle. T. gondii is found in as many as 20% of humans.

A research group from the University of Leeds was able to show that a bacterium, Toxoplasma gondii, found in a large percentage of humans, affects the brains of mice in such a way as to direct the actions and behaviors of the infected rodents.

The researchers were able to show that the bacteria cause the mice to lose their fear of cats and thus make it far more likely they would get eaten, helping the parasitic bacteria to complete their life cycle in their main host.

A Discovery Channel program, The World’s Dirtiest Man, made an interesting statement in this regard (paraphrasing): as many as 90 percent of the cells on our body are actually bacteria, leaving only 10% human.* I was shocked! I had to rewind the old Tivo and catch that again.

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